America the Beautiful – Pictorial Portrayal

 It has often been said that a picture is worth a thousand words. I want to fulfill that statement in my blog this week by using more pictures than words. My Reader, on Friday we will be celebrating the 4th of July, so join me in focusing upon the true meaning of this holiday through pictures.

July 4, 1776
The Birth of the Nation known as the United States of America
Independence Day

 

memorial-dayJuly 4, 2014
Celebrating the Independence of the United States of America
Independence Day

fireworks (MF)

As I see pictures with my eyes, I hear music with my ears. I believe the words of America the Beautiful, written by Katherine Bates, articulate and describe our nation in an excellent way. According to Wikipedia, Bates originally wrote the words as a poem entitled Pike’s Peak that was first published in the edition of the church periodical The Congregationalist in 1895. At that time, the poem was titled America. Later, the music was composed by Samuel A. Ward. This hymn is one of my favorite American patriotic songs. My Reader, join me in viewing a pictorial portrayal of the words for the first verse of this song. These words are those of the 1904 version of this poem or song.

America the Beautiful
by Katharine Bates

clouds-1O beautiful for spacious skies,

wheatFor amber waves of grain.

mountainsFor purple mountain majesties

plainsAbove the fruited plain!
america-flag  America! America!
God shed His grace on thee,

 

brotherhoodAnd crown thy good with brotherhood

sea From sea to shining sea!

Celebrate!

My Reader, celebrate the independence of our nation today! Take time to reflect upon the beauty of our nation on both physical and spiritual levels. As you watch a display of fireworks, remember that they represent the fireworks of battle released in 1776. Be sure to display our American flag as a symbol of freedom and fruitfulness for the United States of America.

 

Joyfully
Cheryl
gold apple new

 

 

 

 

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